American Arab

American Arab
Genre:
Documentary | Director: Usama Alshaibi | Language: English | Length: 60 minutes | Country: United States | Year: 2013 | Rating: NR, some strong language

In Kartemquin’s American Arab, Iraqi-born Director Usama Alshaibi takes a provocative look at the contradictions of Arab identity in post 9/11 America, weaving his own life’s journey and “coming-of-Arab” experiences into the life stories of several diverse characters. Exploring the values, passions, and hopes of his fellow Arab-Americans, Usama tries to make peace with his conflicted chosen homeland.

Arab-Americans are not one monolithic group, but rather a diverse and complex array of many voices and cultures. This film weaves sadness and humor, anger and satire, provocation and understanding, embracing the multifaceted Arab American experience of post 9/11 America. By shedding light and giving clarity to a recent and difficult time for Arabs living in the US, American Arab shows how the struggles over identity within this documentary are universal.

American Arab is a project of Kartemquin’s first Diversity Fellowship, sponsored by The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation and The Ford Foundation. For more information, see the film’s website: https://www.kartemquin.com/films/american-arab

This film is available to colleges, schools, and libraries through the Cinema Guild, click here for more information.

NCSCOS Essential Standards: WH.H.7, WH.H.8, AH2.H.7, AH2.H.8, 12.C.1.3 (Sociology)

Inch’Allah Dimanche

Inch’Allah Dimanche
Genre:
Biography, Drama | Director: Yamina Benguigui | Language: Arabic, French | Length: 96 minutes | Country: Algeria, France | Year: 2001 | Rating: N/A

This French/Algerian movie tells the story about the life of an Algerian immigrant woman in France. The film is largely descriptive of her family’s experience moving to France and the struggles for autonomy Algerian women continue to face even today. The film won a variety of international awards, including the 2001 International Critics’ Award at the Toronto International Film Festival.. Although Benguigui was urged to change the name of the film after the September 11 attacks, she chose to keep the original title, a portion of which is in Algerian Arabic. This film explores the complexities of immigration and the role of women in Algerian society.

This is a great film to show in French Language classes. French teachers might also have intermediate-advanced students read the book “Dakia, fille d’Alger” to further study of Algeria.

Available for streaming on Netflix.